Tag Archives: local food

Kensington Market and intercultural public space

Image 1 Map mural of Kensington Market

Toronto is a city that proudly celebrates its cultural diversity. Do its public spaces encourage cross-cultural interactions?

Kensington Market is a unique urban pocket of Toronto that possesses some of the city’s most dynamic public spaces and commercial quarters; plus, it exemplifies the mixed and hybrid nature of Toronto’s population. Continue reading

Share on Facebook0Tweet about this on Twitter0Share on LinkedIn0

Cultivating Communities

By Angela Henderson

In Vancouver, Canada, spring takes a few notable forms: cherry blossoms, umbrellas, and community gardens. Situated on Coast Salish Territory, Vancouver’s coastal temperate rainforest climate is a fertile environment for gardens and gardeners alike. Despite the scarcity of urban land, Vancouver has over 75 community gardens located in school yards, city parks, boulevards, disused railways and even at City Hall. Communal gardens in Vancouver are host to a range of urban initiatives and serve a wide cross-section of the community. Digging in the dirt is something we all share in common. Continue reading

Share on Facebook0Tweet about this on Twitter0Share on LinkedIn0

Building (and Protecting) the Core From the Outside

Suburban sprawl has been undermining core urban health across North America for decades, and the Greater Toronto Area has been no exception. This has been relatively accepted in the mainstream. What has not received equal attention, or the concern it deserves, is the idea of ‘peak oil.’ Peak oil, as described on Wikipedia, “is the point in time when the maximum rate of global petroleum extraction is reached, after which the rate of production enters terminal decline.”

Sprawl exacts a heavy toll on our society. It means significantly higher infrastructure costs, longer commutes, higher health costs and the stretching, if not tearing, of our social fabric. These are only some of the ways in which suburban development wastes resources and drains wealth from our urban core. These are also clear present day costs without the context of ‘peak oil.’

Continue reading

Share on Facebook0Tweet about this on Twitter0Share on LinkedIn0