Tag Archives: High Line

OpenCity Weekly Review

Here’s our weekly review rounding up the best stories and ideas in public space from cities around the world. This week we bring you a technicolor Chicago intersection, another High Line imitator, youthful advice, and a Canadian update from the ‘complete streets’ movement.

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The Aesthetics of Juxtaposition

By Jake Tobin Garrett

As the days begin to get warmer, I am looking forward to spending some time at Sugar Beach, one of the newer waterfront public spaces that is part of Waterfront Toronto’s ambitious revitalization of the Toronto’s shoreline. The beach owes its name to Redpath Sugar, a still working piece of Toronto’s industrial past that remains adjacent to the park.

It’s not unusual to see a huge ship carrying thousands of tonnes of raw Brazilian sugar docked at the refinery, unloading its burnt-yellow cargo with cranes that send metallic clangs over the water. I love watching the workers who in turn gaze over the railing of the ship at the people lounging under Sugar Beach’s bubblegum pink umbrellas. It must be an uncommon sight to these workers to be able to stare at sunbathers and kids playing in water fountains while they do their work; but then again, it’s uncommon for a public space like Sugar Beach to share such close proximity to working industry.

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The Importance of Being Movable

By Jake Tobin Garrett

Maybe I’m lazy, but the first thing I do when I get to a park, plaza or other public space is look for a place to sit down. But it’s amazing how many public spaces get seating so wrong. It’s shoved far off in a corner, or plopped in the middle of open plazas where you feel like you’re on display, or, worst, there isn’t any at all. Many times I have wished I could just uproot a giant concrete bench and drag it to where I wanted to sit.

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OpenCity Weekly Review

Here’s our weekly review rounding up the best stories and ideas in public space from around the world. This week we bring you bench innovations in New York, public space distorted by mirrors, financial and land use tools to combat sprawl, and the city that brought you the High Line is now poised to bring you the Low Line.

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NYC’s High Line Park Theatre

By Jake Tobin Garrett

If you’re like most who have been reading about urban projects in the last year or so, you’re probably sick to death of reading about New York City’s amazingly successful High Line Park. You’ve probably heard all about how it took an unused elevated rail trestle and transformed it into a beautifully designed and landscaped linear park. You’ve probably also heard about the billions of dollars in private investment near the park that has been spurred in the area.

But did you know the High Line contained a theatre?

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Paris Plage Brings the Beach to the City

For a month every summer, Paris central is transformed into a beach. Now in its tenth year, Paris Plages is a haven in the city with streets along the Seine closed to traffic and lined with white sand. This year, the sheer scale of the project is amazing with ten times more sand than in previous years that stretches nearly two kilometers along the river’s right bank. Continue reading

OpenCity Weekly Review

Here’s our weekly review rounding up the best stories and ideas in public space from around the world. This week we bring you a video love letter to Toronto’s modernist architecture of the 1960s, a London architecture student’s vision for a farmhouse tower, a Vancouver couple struggling to keep their front yard garden, a global review of pop-up urban spaces, and David Byrne blowing up the world in New York.

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OpenCity Weekly Review

Here’s our weekly review rounding up the best stories and ideas in public space from around the world.

  • Backyard For Rent
  • If you live in New York City the High Line and Central Park are no longer your only options to access green space in the core. A once vacant lot on the Lower East Side of Manhattan has now been transformed into a backyard and can be yours for only $50 an hour. (via Gothamist) Continue reading