Category Archives: Inclusion

How do we Design for Diversity?

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How do we Design for Diversity? We here at OpenCity have spent the last seven years learning about what motivates diverse people to spend time in a place and connect with others. In sharing our research findings in this emerging field, we aim to inspire others to design more inclusive places for culturally diverse communities. For us Design for Diversity is a new way of viewing, planning and designing public space.

Over the summer we launched a nine-point Manifesto, developed a framework and posted a series of blog posts sharing stories and ideas that unpack the Design for Diversity principles and explore how to apply them to the design process. The Design for Diversity Tool Kit, an aide for City builders interested in planning for culturally diverse communities, will be launching soon!  Continue reading

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Play this giant xylophone in London

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London-based pH+ created the temporary structure for the London Centre for Children with Cerebral Palsy (LCCCP)for this year’s edition of the London Festival of Architecture. The pavilion features walls covered in copper pipes, allowing the building to function as a huge xylophone.  The xylophone-like surfaces frame a pathway that forms the pavilion’s perimeter. Children are invited to pick up small mallets at the entrance, allowing them to make music by striking the walls.

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#SitTO: A No-Brainer Idea Whose Time Has Finally Come

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“Nothing is stronger than an idea whose time has come” said Victor Hugo, famous author of Les Miserables and the Hunchback of Notre Dame. Even though he was talking about crime and punishment in the mid-nineteenth century, the sentiment stands, or given this post’s topic, sits. A recent flurry of media attention and a nationally-trending hashtag (#SitTO) has finally started a long overdue conversation about Toronto’s public spaces, namely their lack of public seating. See, while Toronto has no shortage of engaging streets, vibrant neighbourhoods, and dynamic public spaces – seriously check out footage from Jurassic Park during the NBA playoffs – there’s very few places where you can take a load off. Here’s a few reasons in no particular order about why that’s a problem and why you should care about this in the first place.

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Design for Diversity – Tap local talent/diversify your team

design for diversity tap local talent

At OpenCity, we have spent the last seven years learning about what motivates diverse people to spend time in a place and connect with others. Design for Diversity is a new way of viewing, planning and designing public space through a lens of inclusion and diversity. Over the coming weeks we will unpack the Design for Diversity manifesto to ease planners and city lovers into the practice.  Continue reading

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Positivity, freedom, love and nature

Opposite Mirror

In the small Italian town of Arcugnano, 5 murals grace the walls of the local kindergarten. Okuda San Miguel was invited to participate in the 3rd edition of the “Art in the Streets” project where he and his assistant Antonyo Marest used bold colours and patterns to connect the art to the surrounding community. In his own words, Okuda describes how his process was impacted by the children, parents and teachers  of Arcugnano: “I had a project in mind but in Arcugnano I changed my mind to leave a message of positivity, freedom, love and nature”. Continue reading

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Design for Diversity – Welcome the 99%

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At OpenCity, we have spent the last seven years learning about what motivates diverse people to spend time in a place and connect with others. Design for Diversity is a new way of viewing, planning and designing public space through a lens of inclusion and diversity. Over the coming weeks we will unpack the Design for Diversity manifesto to ease planners and city lovers into the practice. “Welcome the 99%” is all about creating inclusive public spaces as a key to good urban design.  Continue reading

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