Category Archives: Identity

Urban decay at Prudhomme’s Landing


What happens when your childhood water park closes down? Well, me and a couple friends decided to find out one sunny day. If you live in the Niagara Region, we’ve all passed Prudhomme’s Landing, an amusement park that in it’s hey-day was decked out with Bumper Cars, Go-Karts, a “Tilt-A-Whirl”, water slides, a wave pool, a lazy river, a haunted house and a motel. Today, the site is more of an eyesore than an attraction. Continue reading

An aerial view from Los Angeles

Aerial videographer Ian Wood has created a cinematic short exploring all Los Angeles has to offer by way of architecture, street art and natural beauty. “I continue to be awe struck by how much of this vast city I have partially or completely overlooked before undertaking this video. And like most voyages of discovery, I’ve realize there’s so much more to find,” Wood describes. For a complete map of the locations click here.

Painted Stories: A tour through the street art of Bogotá


“There’s more to Colombia than cocaine and coffee.”

Rey Garcia is a tour guide on a mission. In his eyes, street art is not only a legitimate art form worthy of a wider audience, but a valuable means of self-expression.

Street art is not illegal in Bogotá. The maximum penalty is akin to a parking ticket. And since relaxing restrictions in 2011, the city has seen its walls explode with color and creativity. Artists come from around the world to participate; an estimated 5,000 murals now cover the city, and new ones go up every week. Continue reading

The New Face of Union Station


Central stations are at the heart of urban history: they play host to the mass transportation systems that allow for the collective movement of millions into city centres. Conveniently, the rise of regional rail systems corresponded with a period of remarkable architecture, as Beaux-Arts and Neoclassical buildings sprung up as hubs for regional mobility. Continue reading

Commoning the Urban

CU2  Against a backdrop of austerity measures and top-down planning interventions, “El Campo de Cebada” – The Barley Field, is an allusion to its former use in the 19th century – in the heart of Madrid’s La Latina neighbourhood illustrates the possibilities of upscaled participative citizenship. Formerly home to a sporting facility in 2009, the 5,500 square metre site was slated to transform into to a private market. However, a hostile atmosphere, coupled with a lack of political foresight, conspired to make the site economically unviable. And so it sat, desolate and fenced in, a veritable scar on the neighbourhood. Continue reading