Category Archives: Identity

Bike Lanes in Santiago

17225275642_4a018b1f7e_o

The city of Santiago, Chile is expanding its biking system and improving mobility as a result. The NGO Ciudad Emergente organized a public intervention to prove that a bike lane could be integrated into a busy street in the city. For one weekend, a temporary and safe 3 km bike lane was available on the three-lane street Eliodoro Yáñez from Tobalaba to Avenida Providencia. Overnight, a team of volunteers transformed one lane into a bike lane by painting lines and installing traffic cones. During the day, safety was assured by human traffic guards and a clear separation between the street and bicycle lanes. Continue reading

Stockton Street

flickr_SergioRuiz4

A relatively ordinary street underwent a radical transformation over the winter holidays into a beautiful shopping and pedestrian plaza called ‘Winter Walk SF’. Two blocks of Stockton Street between Ellis and Geary Street in the heart of Los Angeles’s Union
Square changed for one month into an entertainment complex with special entertainment, regular live performances and festive surprises.
Continue reading

Soundwave by Penda

TheSoundwave_penda_04_Animated-Light_640

Penda recently finished a landscape sculpture in Xiangyang, China, which consists of more than 500 perforated, vibrantly coloured steel fins varying in height. The sculpture marks the entrance gate to the largest Myrtle Tree Garden in Asia. Music, Rhythm and Dance in combination with the surrounding Landscape were the main parameters shaping ‘the Soundwave’. Continue reading

Mi Teleférico—a cable car in the skies of Bolivia

flickr_David Baggins3

A subway in the sky is the new public transportation system in the mountainous and unstable terrain of La Paz, Bolivia. This, the first cable car line in the city, stretches from an area near the center of La Paz and connects with the frenetic city of El Alto located on a high plateau. Continue reading

Canadian Lessons for Winter Cities

help

As the mercury begins to rise above zero in many Canadian cities in March, it’s tempting to pretend that we’ll never again have to bundle up and suffer through frozen-numb faces and temperatures colder than Mars. Though probably required to alleviate our collective cabin fever, in reality about one quarter of our lives in northern cities is spent dealing with winter and its many discontents. This annual recurrence of snow and slush, blizzards and black ice, has largely and traditionally been ignored by urban planners and designers whose work tends to focus on making our cities and spaces livable and functional for only three quarters of the year. Lately, however, a movement has been gaining momentum that is challenging this seasonal myopia and is seeking innovative solutions to combat this oversight.

Continue reading