Category Archives: Design

Open Wide

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Morag Myerscough & Luke Morgan have created a temporary pavilion in the Austrian city of Graz that welcomes both locals and visitors to the fair programs. ‘Open Wide’ is a vibrant and friendly arrival area that can be seen rising through the trees across the park, inviting passersby to enter inside and share ideas. Continue reading

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Wind Flowers by John Dickson

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Dotting the section of Toronto’s West Island shore line some bizarre species of plant, John Dickson’s Wind Flowers are activated by Lake Ontario’s winds. The installation is part of the in/future, a festival of art and music in the abandoned Ontario Place. Made from repurposed cymbals, Wind Flowers respond to the power of the breeze, ranging in intensity from gentle buzzing to dissonant clanging.  Continue reading

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Kensington Road Mural

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If you are familiar with Toronto, you will know that street art is nothing new to the city’s vibrant Kensington Market area but this is officially bananas (and carrots). A group of local volunteers known as the Toronto Public Space Committee painted the city’s first road mural in the middle of Baldwin Street.  Continue reading

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Scadding Court: Design for Diversity Spotlight

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Most urban planners and city leaders agree that diversity is key to creating healthy, inclusive communities but this rarely translates to the day-to-day living experience. We at OpenCity have spent the last seven years learning about what motivates people to spend time in a place and connect with others. We turned our attention to existing public spaces, that have evolved organically, and found some great examples in Toronto. Scadding Court is one of those unique and inclusive spaces in the city that welcomes and connects a diverse group of citizens.
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How do we Design for Diversity?

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How do we Design for Diversity? We here at OpenCity have spent the last seven years learning about what motivates diverse people to spend time in a place and connect with others. In sharing our research findings in this emerging field, we aim to inspire others to design more inclusive places for culturally diverse communities. For us Design for Diversity is a new way of viewing, planning and designing public space.

Over the summer we launched a nine-point Manifesto, developed a framework and posted a series of blog posts sharing stories and ideas that unpack the Design for Diversity principles and explore how to apply them to the design process. The Design for Diversity Tool Kit, an aide for City builders interested in planning for culturally diverse communities, will be launching soon!  Continue reading

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Larger than life in Rio

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In celebration of the Olympic Games in Rio de Janeiro, artist JR has created two new public artworks in the city. The pair of installations build upon the french artist’s ongoing ‘Inside Out‘ project, but adopt a completely novel material in their realization: construction scaffolding. JR depicts two larger than life athletic figures on metal poles, placed in dramatic locations across the urban landscape of Rio. Continue reading

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Design for Diversity – Bend the rules

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At OpenCity, we have spent the last seven years learning about what motivates diverse people to spend time in a place and connect with others. Design for Diversity is a new way of viewing, planning and designing public space through a lens of inclusion and diversity. Over the coming weeks we will unpack the Design for Diversity manifesto to ease planners and city lovers into the practice. In this post, we address the importance of “bending the rules” – the final point in our manifesto. Continue reading

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